Immigrant Visas

Urgent information for visa applicants regarding novel coronavirus:

The U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Brazil have suspended routine immigrant and nonimmigrant visa appointments. We will resume routine visa services as soon as possible but are unable to provide a specific date at this time. For information about visa services at U.S. Embassies and Consulates worldwide, please visit usembassy.gov.

Please see these notices which contain detailed information about the current status of visa services worldwide and visa restrictions related to the COVID-19 global pandemic: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/traveladvisories/ea/covid-19-visa-services-and-restrictions.html

The MRV fee is valid and may be used for a visa application in the country where it was purchased within one year of the date of payment. If you have an urgent matter and need to travel immediately, please follow the guidance provided at https://ais.usvisa-info.com/en-br/iv, or enter in contact via email brazil_contactus+br+info+en@visaops.net, or by phone (https://ais.usvisa-info.com/en-br/iv/information/contact_us) to request an emergency appointment.

Information about the travel restrictions

Entry of foreign nationals who were physically present within the following list of countries within 14 days preceding their entry or attempted entry into the United States is suspended, per Presidential Proclamations 9984, 9992, 9993, 9996 and the subsequent proclamation issued May 24, 2020:

  • Brazil (effective May 26 at 11:59 p.m. EDT)
  • The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, excluding overseas territories outside of Europe;
  • The Republic of Ireland;
  • The 26 countries that comprise the Schengen Area (Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland)
  • The Islamic Republic of Iran;
  • The People’s Republic of China, not including the Special Administrative Regions of Hong Kong and Macau

There are certain exceptions to the suspension of entry, including exceptions for U.S. lawful permanent residents and certain family members of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents, among other exceptions listed in the proclamations. For a complete list of the exceptions, please access the fact sheet about the proclamation. If you reside in, have traveled recently to, or intend to transit or travel to the above list of countries prior to your planned trip to the United States, we recommend you postpone your visa interview appointment until 14 days subsequent to your departure from the subject country(ries).

Information about protecting the U.S. labor market

On April 22, 2020, President Trump signed a proclamation suspending entry into the United States of certain immigrants who present risk to the U.S. labor market during the economic recovery following the COVID-19 outbreak.  The proclamation became  effective at 11:59 p.m. EDT on April 23, 2020.  Pursuant to a subsequent proclamation signed on June 22, 2020, the April 22, 2020 suspension was extended until December 31, 2020. U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents, and those holding valid immigrant visas on the effective date of the April 22, 2020 are not subject to the proclamation.  No valid visas will be revoked under this proclamation.  The U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Brazil have suspended routine immigrant and nonimmigrant visa appointments, but as resources allow, embassies and consulates will continue to provide emergency and mission critical visa services for applicants who are not subject to this presidential proclamation. Please check the full text of the presidential proclamations on the White House website:  Proclamation issued on April 22, 2020 and Proclamation issued on June 22, 2020.  Additionally, if you qualify for an emergency appointment, you are strongly encouraged to postpone your appointment by at least 14 days if you are experiencing flu-like symptoms, or believe you may have been exposed to the novel coronavirus.

Welcome

Immigrant visas to the United States are processed for citizens and residents of Brazil at the U.S. Consulate General in Rio de Janeiro.

To apply for an immigrant visa, a foreign citizen seeking to immigrate generally must be sponsored by a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident immediate relative(s), or prospective U.S. employer, and have an approved petition before applying for an immigrant visa. The sponsor begins the process by filing a petition on the foreign citizen’s behalf with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).  You may wish to review our Directory of Visa Categories on travel.state.gov to learn about the different types of immigrant visas to the United States. Then, follow the steps on the Immigrant Visa Process, or on the Diversity Visa Process, or on the list of visa categories below to begin applying for an immigrant visa.

Once USCIS has approved your petition and you have completed pre-processing with the National Visa Center (NVC), or if you have been selected in the Diversity Visa Lottery and completed processing with the Kentucky Consular Center (KCC), review the instructions given to you by the NVC or the KCC, along with the information presented on this website, for further guidance and instructions.

You cannot begin an application for an immigrant visa at The U.S. Consulate General Rio de Janeiro, or other Posts. The process for all immigrant visas, other than the Diversity Visa Lottery process, begins with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)/U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS). The family member or employer in the U.S., through whom you wish to qualify, must begin the process by filing an I-130 petition or I-129F Fiancé petition, or the I-140 employment petition with the DHS/USCIS office in the United States, as per the instructions on the forms.

Immigrant visa inquiries: immigrationrio@state.gov
Adoption inquiries: adoptionrio@state.gov

A Green Card holder (permanent resident) is someone who has been granted authorization to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis. As proof of that status, a person is granted a permanent resident card, commonly called a “Green Card.”

For information on Boarding Foil, instructions for returning resident petition, green card abandonment, removal of conditional resident status, and children of LPR born abroad, please access the Green Card Holders page.

Each year thousands of U.S. citizens adopt children from abroad and many families in other countries adopt U.S. children. Intercountry adoption is governed by both the laws of the country in which the child lives and the country in which the adoptive parents live. Under U.S. law, there are two distinct intercountry adoption processes: the Hague Convention process and the non-Hague Convention process. Since Brazil is a Hague Convention country, it’s the Hague Convention process that must be followed. For more information, please access the Adoption page on this website.

Warning: For security reasons, visa applicants and U.S. citizens are not allowed to enter the Embassy or Consulates with cell phones and other electronic devices (including, but not limited to, smartwatches, activity monitoring devices, such as fitbits, tablets, laptops, and other recording devices). Liquids/drinks are also not allowed (except for applicants with children that require a bottle). Bags, with the exception of one small purse or equivalent, are also not allowed. All visitors and items brought into the Embassy or Consulates are subject to a complete search. Neither the Embassy nor the Consulates have storage facilities for such items. We strongly discourage our customers from bringing these devices when they come to the Embassy or Consulates to conduct business. If you must bring these devices with you, there are private companies that provide storage facilities for a fee. These companies are not sanctioned by or otherwise affiliated with the U.S. government, and the U.S. government takes no responsibility for devices left in their care.

For Consulate General Rio de Janeiro ONLY.  Until further notice, on days when it is raining, applicants will be able to bring a small, compact, collapsible umbrella with no sharp points into the Consular waiting rooms.  Large umbrellas will not be permitted.